Are You A Good Person? and What Does That Even Mean?

What does it mean to be “good”? Is it doing all the right things? Never messing up? Making sure you stay useful to God?

Not exactly. Biblical goodness does involve moral uprightness, having a good character, and doing the right thing. But Jesus also tells us, “No one is good but one, that is, God” (Matt. 19:17, WEB). So when we’re instructed to do and be good, there’s also an acknowledgment that we don’t already have inherent goodness inside us. For us, becoming good is a process that happens as we become more like God.

One of the fruits of the spirit listed in Galatians 5:22 is “goodness.” It’s the Greek word agathosune (G19), which Zodhiates’ dictionary says “is character energized, expressing itself in … benevolence; active good.” It is a more active character trait than kindness, though the two are similar. When we have God’s spirit inside us, it prompts us to do the same sorts of things that God does because He is good.

Become Good By Following God

Oh taste and see that Yahweh is good. Blessed is the man who takes refuge in him. (Ps. 34:8, WEB)

Our God is good in every way. The Hebrew word tob H2896) means “good” in the broadest sense, including concepts like “better,” “beautiful,” and “pleasant.” There is no limit to the goodness of God, and “those who seek Yahweh shall not lack any good thing” (Ps. 34:10). Not only is the Lord good, but He gives goodness to those who seek Him and follow His example of goodness.

Who is someone who desires life, and loves many days, that he may see good? Keep your tongue from evil, and your lips from speaking lies. Depart from evil, and do good. Seek peace, and pursue it. Yahweh’s eyes are toward the righteous. His ears listen to their cry. (Ps. 34:12-15, WEB)

The better our relationship with God is, the more readily we’ll follow His instructions and example of goodness. We don’t have to already be good for God to want us. We will, however, keep becoming better people the more we let Him work in us. Read more

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Surely Goodness and Kindness Will Follow Me

“The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want” begins one of the most famous passages in scripture. For many, Psalm 23 is their favorite part of the Bible. The whole thing is absolutely beautiful, but today I just want to focus on a phrase at the end.

Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the Lord for ever. (Ps. 23:6, KJV)

The Hebrew word translated “mercy” here is often translated “loving kindness” in more modern versions of the Bible. And this isn’t the only place where God’s loving, kind mercies are linked with His inherent goodness.

O Give Thanks For Who God Is

The link between goodness and kindness is mentioned again and again in songs of praise. Ten times in the Bible we’re told to praise and thank Yahweh “for he is good, for his loving kindness endures forever” (1 Chr. 16:34; 2 Chr. 5:13; 7:3; Ezr. 3:11; Ps. 106:1; 107:1; 118:1, 29; 136:1; Jer. 33:11).

Goodness and loving kindness are an essential part of God’s nature and character. Yahweh (to use His proper name) “is good. His loving kindness endures forever, his faithfulness to all generations” (Ps. 105:5, WEB). This isn’t something that’s ever going to change. We can count on Yahweh — both the Father and the Son — being good, lovingly kind, and faithful forever and ever. And when we walk with them, we’ll get to experience Their goodness and kindness directly. Read more

What’s Behind The Facade?

Yesterday my sister and I went to see a community theater’s production of the musical Jekyll and Hyde. It’s a show that our cousin introduced us to years ago through the soundtrack and we were excited to it on stage. I’m not sure I’d call this a favorite play, but the music is fantastic and the story line prompts some intriguing questions about the nature of human kind and how our personalities work.

Jekyll and Hyde is a classic tale of good and evil. The play is quite different from Robert Lewis Stevenson’s novel, The Strange Case of Doctor Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. In the original version, Jekyll develops a serum to separate his darker side because he’d already started indulging his vices and wanted to keep doing so without fear of discovery. The play offers a more compelling protagonist; a Jekyll searching for a cure to evil on a grand scale. If you’re curious, you can watch a really good high school production of the play on YouTube by clicking here.

This isn’t the sort of play that I recommend frequently. It’s dark. It’s complicated. It’s more sexual than the scandalized ladies sitting behind me expected. It doesn’t end happy (don’t look at me like that — you don’t get spoiler warnings when the book’s 132 years old). But it’s also a deeply compelling story that dives head-first into tough questions about the nature of man. Read more