2020 On My Blog: A Year-End Review In Top 10 Lists

With 2020 finally behind us, I’m continuing my tradition of taking a look back on the blogging part of my year. It was a crazy year in so many ways, but apparently there was one bright side: 2020 was good for blog traffic. Like An Anchor received almost 300,000 more views last year than in 2019, so thank you all for reading so much!

Posts With The Most Traffic

This year, my posts about fictional characters’ personality types took over the list of my top 10 most popular posts. Also, my article about being strong in the Lord (which has always been my most popular Christian post) made the top 10 this year. I suppose it was a topic that people felt was particularly relevant in 2020.

  1. 7 Fictional Characters That You’ll Relate To If You’re An INFP (published 4/15/2019)
  2. 7 Fictional Characters That You’ll Relate To If You’re An INTP (published 4/1/2019)
  3. Dating Your Mirror: ENFP and INFJ Relationships (published 11/11/2017)
  4. 7 Fictional Characters That You’ll Relate to If You’re An INTJ (published 1/14/2019)
  5. 7 Fictional Characters That You’ll Relate to If You’re An ENTP (published 12/10/2018)
  6. 7 Fictional Characters That You’ll Relate to If You’re An ENFJ (published 6/17/2019)
  7. 7 Fictional Characters That You’ll Relate to If You’re An ENFP (published 3/4/2019)
  8. What Does It Mean To Be Strong In The Lord? (12/16/2017)
  9. INFJ Dark Side (published 3/31/2014)
  10. 7 Fictional Characters That You’ll Relate to If You’re An ISFP (published 6/3/2019)

Top 2020 Posts

All of the posts that got the most traffic on my blog last year were published before 2020. Of the new posts I published, these 10 were the most popular.

  1. The Enneagram Types As Fictional Characters
  2. Myers-Briggs Types of the Characters in Avatar: The Last Airbender — Azula, Iroh, Mai, Ty Lee, and Zuko
  3. How Do I Know If I’m an INTP or an INFP?
  4. Myers-Briggs Types of the Characters in Avatar: The Last Airbender — Aang, Katara, Sokka, Suki, and Toph
  5. 10 Things That INFPs Find Extremely Annoying
  6. 10 Things That INFJs Find Extremely Annoying
  7. Need Something New to Do? Here’s What Hobby You Should Try Based on Your Myers-Briggs® Type
  8. 10 Things That INTPs Find Extremely Annoying
  9. 10 Things That INTJs Find Extremely Annoying
  10. How Do I Know If I’m an INFJ or an INTJ?

Top Christian Posts

My Myers-Briggs® posts are popular enough that they push most posts on other topics out of the top 10 for the year. Quite a large number of visitors come to my blog for the Christian content, though, so I thought those posts deserved a special mention. Here are the Christian-themed posts that saw the most traffic in 2020.

  1. What Does It Mean To Be Strong In The Lord?
  2. Water, Spirit, Fire: The Three Baptisms of Christianity
  3. Mercy and Truth Meet Together: INFJ Christians
  4. In The Secret Place: The Promises of Psalm 91
  5. As For Me, I Will Serve The Lord: INTJ Christians
  6. That Which Every Joint Supplies: INFP Christians
  7. Reasons to Pray: Building Relationship With God
  8. To Seek And Search Out By Wisdom: INTP Christians
  9. All Your Heart, Mind, and Soul: ENFP Christians
  10. Letting God Define You

Countries My Visitors Call Home

Instead of doing a top 10 list this year, I’ve included every country that’s home to at least 5,000 of my visitors. There are also dozens more countries not on this list–too many for one short blog post. I can’t tell you how much I love looking at the stats and seeing so many different flags listed next to the views that WordPress tracks.

  1. United States
  2. United Kingdom
  3. Canada
  4. Australia
  5. India
  6. Germany
  7. Philippines
  8. Indonesia
  9. Singapore
  10. France
  11. Poland
  12. Italy
  13. South Africa
  14. Malaysia
  15. Netherlands
  16. Turkey
  17. Mexico
  18. South Korea
  19. Spain
  20. Russia
  21. Sweden

Thank you so much to everyone all around the world who’s reading and commenting on my blog! May this next year be one full of blessings for all of you.

Featured image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Picking A Theme For Next Year

Are you planning to set a New Year’s resolution for 2021?

After the way 2020 has gone, I’m not sure what most people are thinking about this. Do you plan specific resolutions hoping to make 2021 a better year than the last? Avoid resolutions because you’re just in survival mode?

At the beginning of 2019, I shared a post called “Encourage Your Hopes, Not Your Fears,” which talked about the idea of setting an intention for the year rather than making specific resolutions. Resolutions are notoriously easy to break. It’s far more rare to meet someone who actually stuck with a New Year’s resolution and saw it improve their life than it is to meet someone who broke their resolutions almost as soon as they’d made them.

Abandoning resolutions can be disheartening, even though it’s pretty much expected. Resolutions are usually about some kind of positive change–loose 15 pounds, read 1 new book each month, eat less sugar–and when we don’t meet those goals we send ourselves the message that making positive change is hard/impossible. We might laugh at our weakness or joke about how hard it is to keep resolutions, but I think it still discourages us if we set goals that we know we’re unlikely to meet. You’re not going to convince yourself change is possible by setting yourself up to fail.

Just because resolutions aren’t a great form of goal setting, though, doesn’t mean we shouldn’t resolve to make steady improvements each year. Personal growth is about forward progression over time. We don’t have to get all our growth work out of the way within the next couple of months (nor should we expect that’s possible). Growing is something we do our whole lives, and it often happens in cycles. We go through periods where it feels like we’re spinning our wheels and times when it’s easy to see our progress.

It is often far more useful to have a broad intention or theme for growth, which can adapt as our lives change, rather than a more specific resolution that we’re likely to break. This idea brings us to a video from CGP Gray that I’d like to share:

Whether you call it a theme, intention, or something else, setting a broad and adaptable goal for the year (or for parts of the year) can be a fantastic alternative to the traditional New Year’s resolution. This is about changing the trend of your life in manageable ways. For example, CGP Gray talks about his “Year of Novelty” and “Year of Order,” as well as suggesting “Year of Reading” or “Year of Health” as possible themes. Themes are what he calls a “fuzzy, high level, longer-term way to navigate your brain” that help you “build a life you want to live.” Themes like this might last a year. Or you might pick two themes and devote half the year to each. Or you could change themes with the seasons. It’s up to you.

You could even pick a theme that you’re already working on. For example, I’ll be starting my second semester of grad school as the New Year begins. I could call 2021 my “Year of Learning” and make it my intention to take opportunities to learn when they come up. That could involve making the most of classes I’m already taking, saying “yes” when opportunities like publishing an article or attending a conference open up, or reading a few more non-fiction books that don’t directly relate to my classes. If I have the time, maybe I finally take a class in sign language or first-aid like I’ve been wanting to do for years. Or I could learn some of the baking techniques that intrigue me when I’m watching The Great British Baking Show. I don’t have a specific resolution so all of these could work, and if I only do some of them (or do something else learning related that’s not on this list) them I’ve still participated in a Year of Learning.

What do you think of choosing a theme for the new year instead of a resolution? Do you have an idea of what sort of theme or intention you’d like to set? I’d love to hear about it in the comments!

Featured image by Dung Tran from Pixabay

2019 On My Blog: A Year End Review In Top 10 Lists

So we’ve come to the end of another year, which means another year-end blog recap in the form of top 10 lists. I wrote in last year’s recap that one of my big goals for 2019 was to continue growing my blog. That certainly happened. Traffic increased significantly between last year and this, and I want to thank all of you for visiting my blog and for sharing my posts with your friends. It means so much to me ❤

Posts With The Most Traffic

For the second year in a row, my ENFP-INFJ relationships post is by far the most popular. The other top posts changed quite a bit, and feature a surprising (to me at least) number of my posts about fictional characters’ personality types.

  1. Dating Your Mirror: ENFP and INFJ Relationships (published 11/11/2017)
  2. INFJ Dark Side (published 3/31/2014)
  3. Want To Date An INFJ? Here’s 15 Things We’d Like You To Know (published 9/18/2018)
  4. How To Tell If An INFJ Likes You (published 1/7/2019)
  5. 7 Fictional Characters That You’ll Relate to If You’re An INTJ (published 1/14/2019)
  6. INFJ User Guide (published 6/20/2016)
  7. Religion and the INFJ (published 10/17/2016)
  8. 7 Fictional Characters That You’ll Relate To If You’re An INTP (published 4/1/2019)
  9. Updated Disney Princesses MBTI Chart (published 12/19/2016)
  10. Fictional MBTI – Tony Stark (ENTP) (published 6/15/2015)

Top 2019 Posts

Read more

Encourage Your Hopes, Not Your Fears

I’m not really big on New Year’s resolutions, but people talk about them enough that the idea is something I think about. And so January has become a time for thinking about what happened last year, what I’d like to change in this next year, and how I plan to “show up” for my life.

Part of this focus in the new year comes along with participating in 30 days of yoga. I’ve been doing this Yoga With Adrienne program every January since 2015 and it’s a wonderful way to check in with yourself, get healthy, and focus on becoming a person who can serve others wholeheartedly. In addition to this, I happened upon an interesting blog post titled “Intentions Not Resolutions.” 

“I no longer make New Year’s resolutions – they’re too easy to give up on after week one and only become a source of guilt. … Instead, a few years ago, I began starting my New Years by choosing a word to inspire the kind of intentional living I wanted to focus on for the year.” — Jen of E.C.B.C

I’d sort of tried this last year when I discovered a site called My Intent that makes bracelets with a custom word on them. I couldn’t pick one word, though, and ended up with a bracelet that says “Balance” and “Connect.” I rarely wear it any more, though those two concepts still resonate deeply.

Encourage Your Hopes, Not Your Fears | LikeAnAnchor.com
Photo credit: MarrCreative via Lightstock

I’ve been thinking for a while now that if I made a new bracelet it would say “fearless.” What with working through my breakup and (finally) getting counseling for the anxiety I’ve been living with for 15+ years, 2018 was a year that I realized that 1) I have a lot of fears, and 2) I don’t have to let them control me.

There’s another bracelet that I picked up last year at an art festival that says, “Encourage your hopes, not your fears.” I’ve been wearing that one a lot. It’s the perfect message to combat my anxiety, which generally pushes hopes aside behind all the things that could go wrong because of all the things that I’m sure are wrong with me. But if I spend all my time turned inward thinking about my fears, then I’m just encouraging my anxiety to take over.

If, on the other hand, I encourage my hopes it changes things. And if I can learn to do that more consistently it might drastically change things. I hope I can keep growing this blog to reach and encourage more people. I hope that I’ll stop sabotaging myself because I’m scared of dealing with everything that might come with being a successful blogger and author. I hope I can climb out of my own head more often and connect with others (including God) in a deeper way.

My intention for 2019 isn’t just one word, but I do have one. I’m going to encourage my hopes, not my fears.

What about you? Did you set any intentions or resolutions for the New Year?

2018 On My Blog: Top 10 Lists

Once again the Gregorian calendar advances by one year. Sticking with tradition, I spent New Year’s Eve with my cousin and sister and now I’m using my first post of the new year to share my blogging highlights from last year.

This has been a big year for my blog. It’s got a name now, for one thing, since we went from marissabaker.wordpress.com to LikeAnAnchor.com. The number of visitors is holding pretty steady from last year, though it did go up a little.

One of my big goals for this upcoming year is to continue growing my blog, but that’s a subject for another post. Today’s post is about looking back on the most popular posts of 2018 and celebrating all you lovely people who’ve been reading my work.

Posts With The Most Traffic

All of the top posts this year are about INFJs, which isn’t really surprising. I was kinda surprised that my ENFP-INFJ relationships post is the most popular of all my posts, though. I guess I’ll put that on the list of good things that came out of my (now ended) relationship.

  1. Dating Your Mirror: ENFP and INFJ Relationships (published 11/11/2017)
  2. INFJ User Guide (published 6/20/2016)
  3. Religion and the INFJ (published 10/17/2016)
  4. Want To Date An INFJ? Here’s 15 Things We’d Like You To Know (published 9/18/2018)
  5. The Vanishing INFJ (published 11/28/2016)
  6. INFJ Dark Side (published 3/31/2014)
  7. The INFJ Stare (published 8/5/2013)
  8. Living With INFJ Guilt And Overcoming Cycles of Shame (published 11/13/2018)
  9. The Single INFJ (published 4/18/2018)
  10. How To Be Friends With An INFJ (published 10/13/2014)

Top 2018 Posts

Read more

An Introvert’s Guide To Hosting A New Year’s Party

I always spend New Year’s Eve with my sister and cousin. There’s just the three of us, but we call it a party anyway. The tradition started with my cousin’s family hosting much larger New Year’s parties, and then after those went away the three of us just kept spending New Years together.

Though one of us (my cousin) is an ENFP, our New Year’s parties are very much something you could describe as introverted. There’s a small number of people and the party activities are generally relaxed, stay-at-home sorts of things. And because our sort of New Year’s party is clearly the best kind there is, I’ve made this helpful little guide to help other introverts (and those who like “introverted” parties) to host their own.

How To Host An Introverted New Year’s Party

Step One: Decline all invitations to traditional New Year’s parties.

Step Two: Find a small number of people you enjoy being around and who will get along well with each other. Read more